Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology

DEC 2017

An evidence-based, peer-reviewed journal for practicing clinicians in the field of dermatology

Issue link: https://jcadonline.epubxp.com/i/918586

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31 JCAD JOURNAL OF CLINICAL AND AESTHETIC DERMATOLOGY December 2017 • Volume 10 • Number 12 O R I G I N A L R E S E A R C H TEWL readings (Figure 3) began to decrease after 28 days of use and the decrease continued to progress until 56 days of using test products. A decrease in TEWL as compared with at baseline (Table 4) was evident at 28 days (-9.79%), and the trend continued through to 56 days (-13.54%). This signified that the test product reduced water loss after 28 days of use and the reduction progressively improved for 56 days. EC, a measure of water content of skin, increased dramatically at 15 minutes (Figure 3) and remained above baseline for up to 56 days (Table 4). The increase was significant after 15 minutes (p = 0.009, 80.15%), 14 days (p = 0.048, 61.60%), and 28 days (p = 0.031, 82.44%). This showed that the test product helped to increase the moisture content in the skin almost immediately after application and continued to increase for 56 days with regular use of product. Clinical examples of patients at baseline and after 28 and 56 days of treatment with the day facial cream are shown in Figures 4 and 5. Night facial cream. As shown in Figure 6, SELS started to decline 15 minutes after product application and continued to decrease during the study period. A decrease in SELS as compared with baseline (Table 4) was also evident as early as 15 minutes (-22.41% difference), reached a maximum at 28 days (-30.92%), and remained well below baseline at 56 days (-28.41%). Differences from baseline were significant after 15 minutes (p=0.037), 28 days (p=0.041), and 56 days of use (p=0.016). TEWL readings (Figure 6) began to decrease 15 minutes after the initial application and progressively declined for the remainder of the study. A decrease in TEWL as compared with baseline (Table 4) was evident after 15 minutes (-11.73%) and reached a maximum decrease at 56 days (-40.25%). Differences from baseline were significant after 28 days (p=0.029, -28.68%) and after 56 days of use (p=0.017). EC increased dramatically after 15 minutes (Figure 6) and continued to increase above baseline for up to 56 days (53.44%) (Table 4). Differences from baseline were significant after 15 minutes (p=0.034, 97.78%), seven days (p=0.009, 34.54%), 14 days (p=0.006, 40.72%), 28 days (p=0.012, 41.46%), and 56 days (p=0.017) of use. Clinical examples of patients at baseline and after 14 and 28 days of treatment with night facial cream use are shown in Figures 7–10. Eye cream. As shown in Figure 11, SELS started to decline 15 minutes after product application and continued to decline during the remainder of the study period. A decrease in SELS as compared with at baseline (Table 4) was FIGURE 7. A 56-year-old Caucasian woman at baseline (A) and after 14 days of treatment (B) with the night facial cream—Pixel data (7,407 at baseline and 2,118 at 14 days) show that the horizontal wrinkle was reduced by 71.41% FIGURE 4. A 51-year-old Caucasian woman at baseline (A) and after 28 days of treatment (B) with the day facial cream— Pixel data (85,098 at baseline and 64,518 at 28 days) show that vertical and horizontal wrinkles were reduced by 24.08%. FIGURE 5. A 44-year-old Caucasian woman at baseline (A) and after 56 days of treatment (B) with the day facial cream—pixel data (2,123 at baseline and 547 at 56 days) show that the wrinkle below the eye was reduced by 74.23%. FIGURE 6. Changes in evaluation parameters for the night facial cream SELS: standard evaluation parameter; TEWL: transepidermal water loss; EC: electroconductivity A A B B A B

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