Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology

DEC 2017

An evidence-based, peer-reviewed journal for practicing clinicians in the field of dermatology

Issue link: https://jcadonline.epubxp.com/i/918586

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30 JCAD JOURNAL OF CLINICAL AND AESTHETIC DERMATOLOGY December 2017 • Volume 10 • Number 12 O R I G I N A L R E S E A R C H normally performed their skin care regimen in the evening. These subjects used the facial cleanser twice a day, the bamboo microdermabrasion exfoliant 2 to 3 times per week, and the eye product and night facial product each evening. Group 3 comprised patients who normally performed their skin care regimen in the morning. These subjects used the facial cleanser twice a day, the bamboo microdermabrasion exfoliant 2 to 3 times per week, and the eye product and day facial product each morning. Group 4 was more of a niche group of patients, and comprised only those interested in lip products. Part of this group only used the day lip product applied multiple times throughout the day. The other part of the group used the night lip product once in the evening. Finally, Group 5 comprised those patients with dry skin or more mature skin who typically use skin care products twice a day. This group was instructed to use the facial cleanser twice a day, the bamboo microdermabrasion exfoliant 2 to 3 times per week, and the eye product in the morning and evening along with the revelant day facial and night facial product. Each subject completed an assessment of the topical product(s) effects after four weeks of use. Subjects agreed to a washout period of at least four days unless enrolled in Group 4. Subjects who had been consistently using face creams containing retinoids or hydroxyl acids were permitted to continue but did not start a new regimen of these products during the four-week study period. Subjects completed the survey at the end of the study. Professional estheticians also examined the skin of the subjects for one or more improvements (e.g., overall improvement, hydration, softness, smoothness, radiance or brightness, and improvement in lines and wrinkles). The physicians who participated in this study had busy practices that required frequent use of highly trained estheticians with extensive experience in clinical assessments similar to those used in the study. RESULTS The 56-day study. SELS, TEWL, and EC were measured at each time point as described above. Readings were also compared with those from baseline, and the percent differences between baseline and each time point were tabulated for each test product (Table 4). Day facial cream. As shown in Figure 3, SELS started to decline 15 minutes after product application and continued to decline during the remainder of the study period. Skin surface roughness, or depth of fine and coarse wrinkles, decreased immediately after product application and continued to improve for 56 days with regular use of the product. A decrease in SELS as compared with at baseline (Table 4) was also evident as early as 15 minutes (-12.61% difference) and reached a maximum at 56 days (-33.12%). The decrease was significant after 14 days (p=0.024) and after 28 days of use (p=0.012). FIGURE 3. Changes in evaluation parameters for the day facial cream SELS: standard evaluation parameter; TEWL: transepidermal water loss; EC: electroconductivity TABLE 4. Mean difference from baseline (%) for each test PARAMETER TIMEPOINT 15 MINUTES 7 DAYS 14 DAYS 28 DAYS 56 DAYS Day facial cream SELS -12.61 -22.48 -18.94 -33.03 -33.12 TEWL 4.47 7.57 -0.42 -9.79 -13.54 EC 80.15* 12.95 61.60* 82.44 66.55 Night facial cream SELS -22.41* -9.80 -25.52 -30.92* -28.41* TEWL -11.73 -5.91 -21.43 -28.68* -40.25* EC 97.78* 34.54* 40.72* 42.46* 53.44* Eye cream SELS -10.24 -30.25* -40.40* -44.85 -45.19 TEWL -2.27 0.19 -13.41 21.02 21.15 EC 103.10* 22.04* 26.67* 38.24* 75.49* Day lip cream SELS -16.79 -11.21* -15.63 -22.37 -30.60 EC 63.82* 10.09 10.57 33.30 35.27 Night lip cream SELS -11.87 -7.40* -13.39* -17.70* -24.79* EC 27.16* 1.50 19.90 34.40 45.52 SELS: surface evaluation of living skin; TWEL: transepidermal water loss; EC: electroconductivity *statistically significant

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