Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology

OCT 2017

An evidence-based, peer-reviewed journal for practicing clinicians in the field of dermatology

Issue link: http://jcadonline.epubxp.com/i/900562

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52 JCAD JOURNAL OF CLINICAL AND AESTHETIC DERMATOLOGY October 2017 • Volume 10 • Number 10 c ommunity of trained and certified medical professionals in the field of dermatology, we need to determine an acceptable wait time range for patients with a concern for skin cancer, to evaluate and determine whether we are meeting that measure, and to promptly make adjustments in the dermatology physician workforce (which may include physician extenders who work in dermatology offices), if needed," the authors concluded. * For more information, http://www.ajmc.com/newsroom/physician- extenders-reduce-wait-times-for-dermatology- appointments-study-finds THE AMERICAN HEALTH COUNCIL HONORS DEBBIE PALMER BBA, DO, FAOCD, FAAD, FOR BEST IN MEDICINE The American Health Council announced Medical Director and co-founder of Dermatology Associates of New York, Debbie Palmer BBA, DO, FAOCD, FAAD, as the Best in Medicine award recipient for 2017. With almost two decades of experience in the healthcare industry, 15 years of which have been spent establishing her own private dermatology practice, the American Health Council recognized Dr. Palmer's clinical insight and entrepreneurial spirit in medicine. * For more information, http://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/D ebbie-Palmer-BBA-DO-FAOCD-FAAD-is-Honored- by-the-American-Health-Council-for-Best-in- Medicine-1006444301 ORAL CONTRACEPTIVE PILLS (OCPS) FOR TEEN ACNE: SEEK PARENTAL CONSENT The legal ambiguity around minors' ability to consent without parental involvement to oral contraceptive pills for acne suggests that dermatologists err on the side of caution, according to a Viewpoint article in JAMA Dermatology. The article was written in response to a data "blind spot" in the treatment of acne, p articularly regarding the use of hormonal therapies—four of which are FDA-approved for acne treatment. Having transparent policies, coupled with physician awareness of consent laws and resources for oral contraceptive pill counseling, will improve care for young women with acne, the authors said. * For more information, http://dermatologytimes.modernmedicine.com /dermatology-times/news/ocps-teen-acne- seek-parental-consent ATOPIC DERMATITIS: BIOLOGICS TO WATCH IN 2018 The future of biologic treatment for atopic dermatitis might be quite diverse. While dupilumab represents the approved first biologic therapy for atopic dermatitis, 2018 might bring news on a variety of such as IL-13 and IL-17. Authors featured IL-13 specific monoclonal antibodies tralokinumab and lebrikizumab, IL-31 targeting agents BMS- 981164 and nemolizumab, IL-22 antibody ILV- 094, and IL-17 antibodies secukinumab and ustekinumab. * For more information, http://dermatologytimes.modernmedicine.com /dermatology-times/news/atopic-dermatitis- biologics-watch-2018?page=0,0 AMERICAN ACADEMY OF DERMATOLOGY (AAD) OFFERS MERIT-BASED INCENTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEM (MIPS) GUIDANCE The AAD is assisting with the MIPS by offering a series of tools that guide users based on customized input. The MIPS tool, created by the AAD, includes an outline of eligibility and financial requirements in a step-by-step format. * For more information, http://dermatologytimes.modernmedicine.com / dermatology-times/news/aad-offers-mips- guidance AFRICAN-AMERICAN CHILDREN LESS LIKELY TO RECEIVE TREATMENT FOR ECZEMA DESPITE INCREASED SEVERITY A new study shows Caucasian children in the United States are more likely to see a doctor for treatment of eczema than African-American children, despite the fact that the disease is likely more severe among minorities. Research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found that African- American children with eczema were 30- percent less likely to see a doctor for their eczema than their Caucasian counterparts. The study, published recently in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, also found that African-American children who see a doctor about the condition have more visits and receive more prescriptions than Caucasian children, indicating more severe disease. * For more information, https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/201 7-09/uops-bcl092917.php JCAD N E W S & T R E N D S

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