Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology

OCT 2017

An evidence-based, peer-reviewed journal for practicing clinicians in the field of dermatology

Issue link: http://jcadonline.epubxp.com/i/900562

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39 JCAD JOURNAL OF CLINICAL AND AESTHETIC DERMATOLOGY October 2017 • Volume 10 • Number 10 R E V I E W hepatocellular carcinoma in vitro and in vivo. Abstracts of the 3rd ITLT Essen 2013 / Digestive and Liver Disease 45S (2013) S249. 40. Saraswati S, Kumar S, Alhaider AA. α-santalol inhibits the angiogenesis and growth of human prostate tumor growth by targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2- mediated AKT/mTOR/P70S6K signaling pathway. Mol Cancer. 2013;12:147. 41. Dickinson SE, Olson ER, Levenson C, et al. A novel chemopreventive mechanism for a traditional medicine: East Indian sandalwood oil induces autophagy and cell death in proliferating keratinocytes. Arch Biochem Biophys. 2014;558:143–152. 42. Ortiz C, Morales L, Sastre M, et al. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity assessment of sandalwood essential oil in human breast cell lines MCF-7 and MCF-10A. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2016;3696232. 43. Matsumura S, Itoi-Ochi S, Terao M, et al. Sandalwood oil enhanced epithelial- mesenchymal transition and promoted wound healing. J Dermatological Sci. 2016;84:e137. 44. Busse D, Kudella P, Grüning NM, et al. A synthetic sandalwood odorant induces wound- healing processes in human keratinocytes via the olfactory receptor OR2AT4. J Invest Dermatol. 2014;134(11):2823–2832. 45. Denda M. Newly discovered olfactory receptors in epidermal keratinocytes are associated with proliferation, migration, and re-epithelialization of keratinocytes. J Invest Dermatol. 2014;134(11):2677–2679. 46. Opdyke D. Reviews on fragrance raw materials. Sandalwood oil, East Indian. Food and Cosmetics Toxicology. 1974;12(Supp):989–990. 47. Ishizaki M, Ueno S, Oyamada N, et al. The DNA- damaging activity of natural food additives (III). J Food Hygiene Society, Japan 1985;26:23–527. 48. Burdock GA, Carabin IG. Safety assessment of sandalwood oil (Santalum album L.). Food Chem Toxicol. 2008;46(2):421–432. 49. Tisserand R, Young R. Essential oil profiles. In: Tisserand R, Young R (eds). Essential Oil Safety. 2nd ed. Edinburgh, UK: Churchhill Livingstone Elsevier; 2014:418–419. 50. Zundel JL. PhD Thesis. Université Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg France (1976). 51. Haque, MH, Haque AU. Compositions for the prevention and treatment of warts, skin blemishes and other viral-induced tumors. US Patent. 1999;5,945,116. 52. Haque, MH, Haque AU. Use of alpha- and beta- santalols, major constituents of sandalwood oil, in the treatment of warts, skin blemishes and other viral-induced tumors. US Patent. 2002;6,406,706. 53. Haque, MH, Haque AU. Use of sandalwood oil for the prevention and treatment of warts, skin blemishes and other viral-induced tumors. US Patent. 2000;6,132,756. 54. Clinicaltrials.gov. Searched for "East Indian sandalwood oil." Available at: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results term=east+indian+sandalwood+oil &Search=Search. Accessed May 12, 2017. 55. Palatty PL, Azmidah A, Rao S, et al. Topical application of a sandalwood oil and turmeric based cream prevents radiodermatitis in head and neck cancer patients undergoing external beam radiotherapy: a pilot study. Br J Radiol. 2014;87(1038):20130490. 56. Moy RL, Levenson C, So JJ, Rock JA. Single-center, open-label study of a proprietary topical 0.5% salicylic acid-based treatment regimen containing sandalwood oil in adolescents and adults with mild to moderate acne. J Drugs Dermatol. 2012;11(12):1403–1408. 57. Browning JC, Rock J, Levenson C, Becker EM. Safety, tolerability and efficacy of a novel regimen containing 0.1% colloidal oatmeal and East Indian sandalwood oil (EISO) for the treatment of mild, moderate and severe pediatric eczema (atopic dermatitis) – results of a single-center, open-label study. Presented as a poster at the Orlando Derm and Clinical Aesthetic Conference. Doral, FL. 13–16 January 2017. 58. Browning JC, Rock J, Levenson C, Becker EM. Open- label marketing trials to evaluate an over-the- counter (OTC) 17% salicylic acid regimen containing highly purified sandalwood oil for the treatment of common warts (Verruca vulgaris) in pediatrics. Presented as a poster at the Orlando Derm and Clinical Aesthetic Conference. Doral, FL. 13–16 January 2017. 59. Reuter J, Merfort I, Schempp CM. Botanicals in dermatology: an evidence-based review. Am J Clin Dermatol. 2010;11(4):247–267. 60. Thandar Y, Gray A, Botha J, Mosam A. Topical herbal medicines for atopic eczema: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials. Br J Dermatol. 2017;176(2):330–343. 61. Shenefelt PD. Herbal Treatment for Dermatologic Disorders. In: Benzie IFF, Wachtel-Galor S, eds. In: Herbal Medicine: Biomolecular and Clinical Aspects. 2nd edition. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press/Taylor & Francis; 2011. 62. Fisk WA, Lev-Tov HA, Clark AK, Sivamani RK. Phytochemical and botanical therapies for rosacea: a systematic review. Phytother Res. 2015;29(10):1439–1451. 63. Herman A, Herman AP. Topically used herbal products for the treatment of psoriasis: mechanism of action, drug delivery, clinical studies. Planta Med. 2016. [Epub ahead of print]. 64. RM Aldens Labs, Culver City California; unpublished results, 2010. 65. University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Fungal Testing Laboratory, San Antonio Texas; unpublished results, 2010. JCAD

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